Gluten Free Canada

In addition to searching reviews on our website, GlutenFreeTravelSite, for informative first-hand travel and dining feedback from others on gluten free diets, it's a good idea to contact a support group in the area you plan to travel. Many times they will be able to provide you with a list of Celiac-friendly restaurants and grocery stores that offer gluten free foods. Here's a list of the well-known Celiac associations, both in the U.S. and worldwide...their websites have contact information and often list support groups/chapters. National Celiac Association: Incorporating the former Celiac Support Association, NCA provides educational materials, works with industry and the government to improve labeling practices, and offers a Recognition Seal certifying products as Gluten Free. Beyond Celiac: In addition to promoting awareness and having numerous valuable resources for Celiacs on their site, this U.S.-based foundation has a very helpful list of Celiac Disease support groups around the world. Gluten Intolerance Group (GIG): They are involved in advocacy as well as GF certification and accredidation for products, food services, and restaurants. They include contact information for their local chapters in the United States. Canadian Celiac Association (CCA): Provides information on sources of gluten free food, fosters research, and encourages... Read more →


Our family had the good fortune to travel to Whistler, British Columbia last month for our kids' Spring Break. It had been four years since Easter had fallen early enough to make a ski trip possible. Since their vacation was the last week in March this year, we knew that skiing out West -- especially as far north as British Columbia -- would be reliable. What a surprise it was to encounter temperatures in the 50's most of the week -- and in the 60's the last couple days! "No worries," as the many Aussies and Kiwis that work in and travel to Whistler would say...the skiing was still great. At least on the top two-thirds of the mountain (admittedly, the snow got a bit slushy at the base by the time the afternoon rolled around). Whistler and Blackcomb mountains, adjacent to each other and surrounding the quaint, European style Whistler Village, provide the largest amount of skiable terrain in North America. Several friends had recommended we try it out, and we were glad we did. We're big fans of Park City/Deer Valley, but it was nice to try skiing "north of the border" in Canada. The locals, seasonal workers,... Read more →